The Best Sim Racing Shifters – Buyer’s Guide

the best sim racing shifter - the pro sim h pattern

Featured image: Pro-Sim H-Pattern sim racing shifter (source)

Today we’re looking at a handful of higher end intermediate to advanced sim racing gear shifters – if you’re a bit fed up with your Thrustmaster TH8A or Logitech Driving Force shifter, this article is for you. The items in this list aren’t your “common or garden variety” units, as I’ve tried to pick shifters that are new to the market, lesser known or just outrageously expensive in some cases! We’ll mention options including hydraulic, elastomer damping, sequential and H-Pattern sim shifters.

While they’re all a bit different, what they all have in common is the coolness factor… Manual shifting in the sim adds huge realism and the discipline of keeping the car balanced while changing gear under braking is something that directly translates into car control technique useful for the real world.

If you’re not sure about the right technique to use while shifting, check out my guide to heel and toe to rev-match in the sim here, and if you’re looking for the best equipment as a beginner, check out my sim racing beginner’s guide.

Contents: What are our top sim racing shifters?

What is “H-pattern” and “sequential”?

The terms “H-pattern” and “sequential” will come up repeatedly in this guide, so in case you’re new to the shifter market and have no idea what I’m talking about, let me give a quick explanation.

H-pattern gearshift in a sequential racing gearbox (image source)

H pattern shifters operate like a standard gear shifter in a manual car, meaning you need to move the shifter lever around a ‘gate’ in an up/down/left/right motion to find whatever gear you want to engage. Sequential shifters only require an up/down or forward/backward motion to move between the gears with no side-to-side movements, but as the name suggests, you must move through the gears in sequence, meaning you cannot jump from first gear to third gear for example as you could with an H-pattern.

As well as shifting modes, another term that you’ll likely hear when talking shifters is ‘throw.’ This refers to the distance the gear lever needs to travel to change gears. A short throw is often preferred for sportier cars, which means less distance, and that equates to a quicker gear shift.

With that out of the way, I’m going to get into the specifics of quality, features, and usability. My goal is not to rank any shifter above another, as for the most part, each one is priced appropriately for what you get. My aim is to give you the key you should know before you buy. Plus, while mounting your shifter isn’t all that glamourous, it plays a massive role in usability, so I’ll also cover some of the mounting options offered, and I’ll pinpoint the overall value of each shifter as we go through the guide.

SHH Newt

The Newt is the latest SHH Shifter and is the company’s fourth evolution of this model. This shifter is capable of both H-pattern and sequential modes. The Newt is available in four colour options, with customisable features also possible for an additional cost.

Newt SSH Shifter
Newt SSH Shifter

The main casing on this unit is made from 3D printed ABS filament, which is known for its toughness and durability, but it still flexes a little when put to real use. The way this shifter’s internal mechanism works is quite innovative. To switch between shifting mode, you only need to push down the shifter lever and rotate it 90 degrees. By using roller bearings, the shifter gives a smooth action to all of your shifts, with the notches in between providing a feel of actually engaging a gear. Of course, this action is much lighter than what you would find in a real gearbox. Another plus here is that there is no contact with the magnetic sensing electronics when making a shift, which does away with a wear point that other shifters might have. This shifter has M6 mounting holes provided, but additional mounting frames will be required depending on your rig. Once mounted, the shifter can move around a little bit, but as the housing is made of ABS plastic, it’s not surprising.

Fanatec ClubSport Shifter SQ V1.5

The Fanatec ClubSport Shifter SQ V1.5 features H-pattern and sequential modes, adjustable resistance, a road car-style reverse gear inhibitor, and when it’s paired with a compatible Fanatec wheelbase, it can be used on PlayStation, Xbox, and PC.

However, if you don’t have a Fanatec wheelbase and want to connect this shifter to your PC as a standalone device, you need to buy the Fanatec USB dongle. In my personal opinion, Fanatec has been somewhat tight-fisted here, and the USB connector really should be supplied in the box.

You can mount the Clubsport via the base or on the side, so with the right bracket or mounting plate (supplied with most turnkey sim rigs) it’s pretty trivial work to fit.

clubsport shifter sq
My Fanatec SQ 1.5 shifter

I’ve used an SQ shifter for about two years now, for the money, it feels pretty solid and it has been for the most part reliable (except for the need for one repair). It’s a great little unit, feels very certain in the hand and it’s easy to be conssistent with it while driving in a hurry.

There’s a slider switch on the side of the unit that changes the shifter from H-Pattern mode to sequential. That’s a neat feature – but it’s pretty much where the features end. If you’re only looking for manual shifting occasionally, the SQ is your best bet.

Heusinkveld Engineering Sim Shifter Sequential

Heusinkveld’s Sim Shifter Sequential is a very compact item, so if you only want sequential and no h-pattern, this is a pretty sturdy and compact addition to your sim.

Heusinkveld Engineering Sim Shifter Sequential
Sim Shifter Sequential from Heusinkveld

The shifter has the feel of a real sequential gearboxbecuase of its ball spring resistance system. With a short throw action that has variable resistance depending on the position. This means that the lever requires a higher initial peak force before the resistance drops as the lever simulates the gearbox sliding into gear:

Shift feel approximation

The unit features soft bump stops which makes shifting a relatively quiet procedure!

Frex HShift

The HShift from Frex does exactly what it says on the tin. It’s an H-pattern only shifter that’s made for PC use. The shifter is modelled after the gear shifter from a Porsche 962 C race car. It has a short throw and a very nice engagement when pushed into the selected gate creating a satisfying tactile click.

Frex h-shift

It doesn’t take much effort to make shifts, and you do have some tuning capability when using this shifter by using its friction adjustment screw to dial your preferred resistance.

Due to its all-metal construction, the body of this unit has a nice solid feel to it. I think Frex made some excellent choices regarding where to use aluminium and where to use stainless steel, and the stainless-steel gate plate helps to give the shifter a smooth feeling action.

There is an irregular spacing between the gates, which takes a bit of getting used to, but you should be fine once muscle memory kicks in. The front mount does its job, but I think having an optional plate would improve this shifter’s overall performance and feel.

Overall, I think the price tag for this shifter is justified in the build quality and performance.

Aiologs Sequential Shifter

The Aiologs Sequential Shifter also does as its name suggests sequential shift only. This is one of the best rated shifters we’ve come across with the highest material and build quality, and highly tactile shift feel. The Aiologs has a clever variable sprint resistance in the throw, meaning you’ll get a sense of where the shifter is actually going to shift. Feedback like this is gold as it adds a clear sense of realism to the the experience.

The rather beautiful Aiologs sim shifter sequential

Aiologs have developed this shifter to feel as real as a Motorsport sequential shifter would feel in a racing car. It also comes with the mounting plate and clamp you’ll need, too – so you shouldn’t expect too many issues during installation.

V2 JINX Sequential Shifter

Jinx items stand out from a lot of the other manufacturers because they’re so impeccably finished. That same rule applies to their V2 JINX Sequential Shifter:

V2 JINX Sequential Shifter (more)

Jinx were new to me until they were suggested for inlcusion in my sim racing forum.

The Jinx Shifter can be mounted on any flat surface and any 8020 rig.  In the package, you’re supplied with the required mounting 8mm bolts and a USB cable for your PC. Each one is custom made on order, so you can have your own logos put on the metalwork, choose the nylon shift handle, and so on. They’re shipped from Australia, so add another 2 weeks to the 14-day delivery quote! Still, Jinx items look the part and may be well worth the wait.

Pro-Sim H Shifter

The Pro Sim H-shifter is a six-speed shifter with a reverse gear. It’s for PC only, made of anodized metal, offers unbelievable immersion, and is overall one of the most amazing shifters on the market.

Pro-Sim H Shifter (source)

It’s been a long wait for race car simulator enthusiasts to finally get a proper ‘feels like you’re in a real car’ shifter, and this unit accomplishes just that.

From the parts used to the quality of the build on this shifter, you can tell that somebody knew what they were doing. The design and engineering that went into the development are just brilliant. There is so much “want!” in this shifter it’s unbelievable.

So much attention has been paid to the details throughout the design of this shifter. Having them manufactured at Quaife engineering proves that the guys at Pro-Sim made all the right moves on this one.

You need to provide a stable mounting solution to realize the full potential that this shifter has to offer. Plus, it’s much larger than most shifters that you’ve ever seen, so you’re going to need space on your rig to get it set up correctly. It won’t fit everyone’s budget, but once you have one of these units in your sim rig, you’ll know why it costs so much. It’s just that good.

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The Best Sim Racing Shifters – Buyer’s Guide